Wednesday, November 13, 2019

The One Word in the New Testament That You Should Be Thinking About


"And whosoever shall scandalize one of these little ones that believe in me; it were better for him that a millstone were hanged around his neck, and he were cast into the sea."
(St. Mark 9:41)

"And a mighty angel took up a stone, as it were a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying: With such violence as this shall Babylon, that great city, be thrown down, and shall be found no more at all."
(Revelation 18:21)

All praise be to Jesus Christ, forever and ever amen.

True genesis of this post:

My eyes open this morning. The first thing I think, literally before I am fully awake: the word millstone is used to describe the scandalization of children by Our Lord and also the exact same word is used to describe the method by which "Babylon" is destroyed. That's the only time the word is used in the New Testament because Our Lord wanted to make the connection perfectly clear.

But is it? I had no idea. I wasn't in front of a computer.

Yup. It is:


The Holy Ghost was so emphatic about its importance that it included this saying from Christ in all three synoptic Gospels. These things do not happen by accident. Sacred Scripture was inspired in such a way by God to help His people in millions and millions of different ways. It is clear that God did this on purpose: He wanted to let us know that it was the corruption/scandalization of children that would be the cause of Babylon to be destroyed.

Now the question: What is Babylon?

If you read the subsequent verses it is pretty clear that it means Rome. The millstone touches off an earthquake that results in the destruction of Rome. Was it the paedophilia scandal by mostly homosexual clergy that has disgraced the Church in the eyes of the world and ruined the faith of millions that caused this millstone? If Babylon isn't Rome, is it a the wider culture that corrupts youth, and is this millstone meant for the whole world?

All praise be to Jesus Christ, forever and ever amen.